Thalys, toilets and translations

I try not to spend too much time in train toilets (though I’m less squeamish than in the past, which is fortunate as SNCF still haven’t replied to my letter of July 1996 expressing horror that the ones on their Calais-Avignon Motorail service emptied directly onto the tracks) but, on a recent trip between Belgium and Germany on a Thalys train, my attention was drawn to a map on the back of the toilet door. This less than perfect photo (you try taking one in an ill-lit bathroom at 300km/h) shows a map of the Thalys network, including its seasonal south of France destinations. IMG_20160710_1628488952

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DG MOVE – the user experience (part 1)

On this blog I’m aiming to look at travel and transport communications in the broadest possible sense, including relevant institutional communications. I am after all based in Brussels and so today, in the first of two linked posts, I will focus on the online presence of the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport. What kind of user experience does it offer the average EU citizen? Let’s begin by searching Google for ‘DG MOVE’, the name by which it’s generally known.

The Google Places listing is accurate, if incomplete – the reader is invited to ‘Add phone number’ and ‘Add business hours’. I realize that DG MOVE isn’t a pizza restaurant, but a partial listing arguably looks worse than no listing. Also, Google Maps has automatically generated a very ugly picture to match – although it is transport-themed! While the key information is there and the search results themselves all lead straight to the DG MOVE website, ‘claiming this business’ on Google would result in a better first impression. But what about the website itself?

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Eurostar and Expedia – a lack of class?

As a British person living in Brussels, I always take the Eurostar when I go home – it makes much more sense for me personally than flying or driving. But while the company doesn’t have to work too hard for my custom, there are several things about it that I admire: its willingness to use distinctive advertising that doesn’t take itself too seriously, a social media team that is generally responsive and engaged, and in general a strong and simple visual identity.

(From eurostar.com: a fun and distinctive way of introducing a new route)

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