Book review – Tales from the Fast Trains

I liked the idea of Tales from the Fast Trains. It’s an exploration of how far you can get from London in a weekend (or not much longer) by train. It covers a range of interesting western European cities and it’s by an established travel journalist who appears to have quite a lot of experience of writing about rail journeys. That said, by the end of it I was struggling not to conclude that the succession of local tourist offices and their staff that appear in the acknowledgements had been a key factor in shaping this book.

tft

(Photo from amazon.com)

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DG MOVE – the user experience (part 1)

On this blog I’m aiming to look at travel and transport communications in the broadest possible sense, including relevant institutional communications. I am after all based in Brussels and so today, in the first of two linked posts, I will focus on the online presence of the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport. What kind of user experience does it offer the average EU citizen? Let’s begin by searching Google for ‘DG MOVE’, the name by which it’s generally known.

The Google Places listing is accurate, if incomplete – the reader is invited to ‘Add phone number’ and ‘Add business hours’. I realize that DG MOVE isn’t a pizza restaurant, but a partial listing arguably looks worse than no listing. Also, Google Maps has automatically generated a very ugly picture to match – although it is transport-themed! While the key information is there and the search results themselves all lead straight to the DG MOVE website, ‘claiming this business’ on Google would result in a better first impression. But what about the website itself?

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